Most Popular Articles

  • 30 sexual question you should ask your partner....(part -1)

    Dramatically improving your sex Life.

    1) Do you think it is wise to go to counseling for sexual problems? If not, how would you want to try to work out the problems?

    2) Do you believe that when a couple has sex for the first time, that some sort of commitment is taking place? If so, what?

    3) Given your current sex drive, how often would you like to have sex with your spouse?

    4) Do you have a favorite foreplay activity to turn you on?

    5) Do you like to cuddle after sex?

    6) Is it difficult for you to ask your mate for certain kinds of stimulation?

    7) Does a person's sexual past matter if you really love them?

    8) Do you think that you might have a difficult time having a passionate sex life because of a previous sexual        experience or because of what you were taught about sex growing up?

    9) How would you define satisfying sex?

    10) If I felt that we needed to go to a sex therapist, would you go with me?

    11) On a scale of 1-10, how strong is your sex drive? Is it increasing or is it diminishing?

    12) Do you have any sexual fetishes?

    13) What kind of clothing do you find sexy? What sort of lingerie/underwear would you find most sexy on me for a special night?

    14) Would you get tested for sexually transmitted diseases if I asked you?

    15) Do you like to be visually stimulated during the course of making love?

    16) What would you do if your partner found out he or she had an STD after you had been together?

    17) What body parts turn you on the most?

    18) Would you want to do a sexual act even if your spouse thought it was very unappealing?

    19) Have you ever slept with a person you now know has a sexually

    transmitted disease (about 1 in 5 adults have some sort of STD)?

    20) Have you ever been tested for a STD and what was the outcome? If you are infected, how has it affected your relationships?

    21) Some people think breast and penis size matter when it comes to really good sex. What are your thoughts and/or experiences?

    22) Do you feel self-stimulation is wrong or only when it is accompanied by sexual thoughts of someone besides your mate? Do you think masturbation is an acceptable form of sexual release when your mate isn't in the mood or available?

    23) Have you ever been or gotten someone pregnant?

    24) If you were in an accident and couldn't perform sexually, do you think your lover would be able to cope with that?

    25) If a man has problems maintaining an erection on a regular basis,

    what would you try to do?

    26) Do you have a favorite sex position? Why is it your favorite?

    27) Do you have a preference of making love in the dark, by candlelight or with the lights on?

    28) Who would you feel most comfortable talking with regarding sexual problems? Do you think they are qualified to give you good help and advice?

    29) If you are in the mood for sex and your mate is not, would you rather your mate say "not now" or "I don't think I can climax, but I'd gladly help you get off." Would you ever want to take him or her up on it?

    30)  Have you ever watched a porno movie? If so, how often do you watch them? 

    ....1 MORE

    If you were ever to become addicted to pornography, how would you like me to help you break the habit?

     

     

    Read more
  • Don't waste your life.

    We waste our lives waiting for ideal paths to appear in front of us. But they never do. Because we forget that paths are made by walking, not waiting.

    There’s nothing more disheartening than a perfectly healthy, reasonably affluent human being with the whole world in her hands who’s chronically unhappy and unproductive. There’s really no excuse for it either, yet Marc and I see this phenomenon unfolding every single day—people who choose to be stuck in misery and refuse to admit it. This mindset often results from an extremely unbalanced life—one with too much expectation and not enough discipline and appreciation.

    The bottom line is that when you have very little discipline for accomplishing new things, and very little gratitude for what you already have, you’ll never know the true joy of making progress in life, because nothing will ever change, and even when it does, it will never be good enough in your mind.

    So, how do you cultivate balance in life when everything is already so far out of whack?

    1. Are you focusing on what’s truly important?

    At every moment, millions of little things compete for your attention. All these things fall into one of two categories: things that are important and things that are not.

    People never get more done by blindly working more hours on everything that comes up. Instead, they get more done when they follow careful plans that measure and track key priorities and milestones. So if you want to be more successful and less stressed, don’t ask how to make something more efficient until you’ve first asked, “Do I need to do this at all?”

    Simply being able to do something well does not make it the right thing to do. I think this is one of the most common problems with a lot of time-management advice; too often productivity gurus focus on how to do things quickly, but the vast majority of things people do quickly should not be done at all. 

    2. Are you focusing more on problems or solutions?

    Where your mind goes, energy flows. Which area of your life do you tend to focus on: what you have or what’s missing from your life?

    I’m sure you think about both sides of this equation. But if you scrutinize your habitual thoughts, what do you tend to spend more time dwelling on? The positives or the negatives?

    Rather than focusing on what you don’t have and begrudging those who are better off than you, perhaps you should acknowledge that you have lots to be grateful for. Developing a habit of appreciating what you have can create a new level of emotional well-being and strength. But the real question is: do you take time to feel deeply grateful with your mind, body, heart and soul? That’s where the energy to take positive action comes from.

    So don’t let negativity and drama get the best of you. Your brain is a radio transmitter. It broadcasts thoughts, directions and vibrations into your life—you get to choose the station it’s tuned to. Happy, successful people understand this and tune out negativity to make room for positivity. Be wise enough to follow in their footsteps. Walk away from the nonsense around you. Focus on the positives, and soon the negatives will be harder to see.

    Also, along these same lines, accept the fact that there’s a lot you can’t control. And if you focus on what you can’t control, you’ll do nothing but create more stress for yourself. So remember, you can influence many aspects of your life but you can’t control them entirely. Once you fully accept and adopt this pattern of thinking, another important question must be asked:

    3. What meaning are you assigning to your challenges?

    Even when we’re being positive, we all have challenges; there’s no escaping that. But how you feel about your life has little to do with the events in it or what has (or hasn’t) happened to you. The meaning you assign to these things controls the quality of your life. Most of the time, however, you may be unaware of the effect of your unconscious mind in assigning meaning to life’s events. So check-in with yourself…

    • When something happens that disrupts your life (an illness, an injury, a job loss, etc.), do you tend to think that this is the end or the beginning?
    • If someone confronts you, is that person insulting you, coaching you or trying to care for you?
    • Does a big problem mean that God is punishing you or challenging you? Or is it possible that this problem isn’t really a problem at all, but an opportunity?

    Bottom line: When something negative happens, view this circumstance as a chance to learn something you didn’t know. Don’t wish it never happened. Don’t try to step back in time. Take the lessons learned and step forward. You have to tell yourself, “It’s OK. I’m doing OK.” You need to know that it’s better to cross new lines and suffer the consequences of a lesson learned from time to time, than to just stare at the lines for the rest of your life and always wonder.

    Also keep in mind that the past, even when troubled, is invaluable to your present. It provides a solid foundation for everything you’re doing now. Learn from it—the mistakes and the successes—and then let it go. This process might seem easier said than done, but it depends on your focus. The past is just training; it doesn’t define you in this moment. Think about what went wrong, but only in terms of how it will help you make things right.

    When we shift our habitual focus and meanings, there’s no limit on what life can become. A change of focus and a shift in meaning can literally alter our biochemistry and the trajectory of our lives in a couple minutes flat.

    So take control and always remember: Meaning equals emotion and emotion equals power. Choose wisely. Find an empowering meaning in any event, and best will always be yours for the taking.

    And that leads right in to the next question…

    4. What will you do next to make progress?

    While everyone else is talking about it, successful people are quietly doing it.

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: It doesn’t matter if you have a genius IQ and a PhD in Quantum Physics, you can’t change anything or make any sort of real-world progress without taking action. There’s a huge difference between knowing how to do something and actually doing it. Knowledge and intelligence are both useless without action. It’s as simple as that.

    Successful people know that a good plan executed today is better than a perfect plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right day” or the “right (impossible) circumstances”, because they know these reactions are based on a fear and nothing more. They take action here and now, today—because that’s where real progress happens. (Love and a beautiful mind)

    5. What tangible reminders do you need to see to stay motivated?

    You want to lose weight, but when you’re tired, it’s easy to rationalize that you’ll start exercising and eating right tomorrow. You want to build a more profitable business, but when you’re caught up in the daily grind, it’s easy to just do what’s familiar instead of what’s required for growth. You want to nurture your closest relationships, but when you’re busy, it’s easy to rationalize that you really need to work on that client proposal instead.

    Few good things come easy, and when the going gets tough we often take the easy way out—even though the easy way takes us the wrong way.

    To combat this, many of the happiest and most successful people we know create tangible reminders that pull them back from the brink of their weak impulses. A friend of ours who has paid off almost £50K of debt in the past five years has a copy of his credit card balance taped to his computer monitor; it serves as a constant reminder of the debt he wants to pay off. Another friend keeps a photo of herself when she was 90 pounds heavier on her refrigerator as a reminder of the person she never wants to be again. And I fill my desk at work with family photos, both because I love looking at them and because, when work gets really tough, my family photos remind me of what i am ultimately working for.

    Think of moments when you are most likely to give in to impulses that take you farther away from your ultimate goals. Then use tangible reminders of those goals to interrupt the impulse and keep you on track.

    Find a Good Example

    Now that you’re aware of the power of these five questions and their subsequent decisions, start looking for role models who are experiencing what you want out of life. When we observe someone we want to learn from and we have a crystal clear idea of what we want to create for ourselves, it unlocks a tremendous amount of motivation. Human beings are socially inclined, and when we get the idea that we want to join some elite circle up above us, that is what really motivates us to reach our potential. “Look, they did it. I can do it too!”

    And yes, you CAN do it too!

    It may sound overly simplistic, but when you spend enough time asking yourself the right questions and studying people who have been where you want to go, you’ll gradually clear a pathway to create the positive changes you desire in life.

    And now, it’s your turn…

    Remember that you ultimately become what you repeatedly do. The acquisition of knowledge—everything you just read—doesn’t mean you’re growing. Growing happens only when what you know changes how you live on a daily basis. Most people miss the second part. Don’t be one of them today.

     

    Read more
  • How to Raise Smarter, Happier Children

    Children have never been perfect at listening to their parents, but they have never failed to imitate them.

     

    1.  Walk the talk — always set a great example.

    It’s not what you say, it’s how you live your life every day.  Don’t tell your children how to live; LIVE and let them watch you.  Practice what you preach or don’t preach at all.  Walk the talk.  Your children look up to you and they will emulate your actions and strive to become who you are.

    So BE who you want them to be.

    In other words, be the change you want to see in your child.  Give what you expect, reflect what you desire, become what you respect, and mirror what you admire.  Every single day.

    Your children are the greatest gift life will give you, and their souls the heaviest responsibility it will place in your hands.  Take time with them, and teach them to have faith in themselves by being a person they can have faith in ..... a person they can trust without question.  When you are old, nothing else you’ve done will have mattered as much.

    2.  Reduce YOUR stress level in the household.

    Not easy, I know, but believe it or not what children want from their parents more than anything else is for them to be happier and less stressed.

    3.  Believe in your children.

    The greatest compliment you can give to a child is to believe in them and let them know you care.  When you see something true, good and beautiful in them, don’t hesitate to express your admiration.  When you see something that is not true, good and beautiful in them, don’t neglect to give them your wholehearted assistance and guidance.

    The simple act of believing that your child is capable and worthy makes a big difference.  It gives them confidence and makes them feel qualified to do great things.

    4.  Praise your children for their effort, not their intelligence.

    Based on the point above, this might sound a bit counter intuitive, but when you praise a child’s efforts you are bringing attention to something they can easily control — the amount of effort they put in.  This is immensely important because it teaches them to persist, and that personal growth through hard work is possible.  They come to see themselves as “in control” of their success in life.

    Emphasizing God-given intelligence takes progress out of your child’s control, and it provides no good recipe for responding to a failure.  In turn, your child may begin to think that innate intelligence is always going to be a missing ingredient for them, and disregard the importance of their effort to learn and grow. With that said, a word to the wise: Don’t over-praise your children for no reason.  Make sure your gestures of praise are warranted.  Because if every single move your child makes is based only on rewards like constant praise, when the praise stops, the effort stops too.  And that’s not good because it means they won’t be able to perform well when you’re not around.

    5.  Don’t read TO your children, read WITH them.

    Got a youngster who’s learning to read?  Don’t let them just stare at the pictures in a book while you do all the work by reading every word to them.  Instead, call attention to the words.  Point to them.  Point to the pictures that illustrate them.

    Read WITH them, not to them.

    Research shows this tactic helps build a child’s reading comprehension.  When shared book reading is enriched with explicit attention to the development of a child’s reading skills, it truly becomes an effective vehicle for promoting early literacy.  Perhaps even more importantly than that, it makes learning more fun.  And as you know, fun times are happy times in a child’s mind.

    6.  Eat dinner together as a family.

    Eating dinner together makes a difference. Research suggests that children who enjoy family meals have larger vocabularies, better manners, healthier diets, and higher self-esteem in the long run.  Even if eating dinner together every night isn’t possible, you should make it a point to eat together as a family at least once a week.

    Even if eating dinner together every night isn’t possible, you should make it a point to eat together as a family at least once a week.

    7.  Create logical, reasonable rules and boundaries for your children.

    Children don’t do well in a free-for-all environment.  It’s a myth that being too strict guarantees rebellion and being permissive drives better behavior.  From the research we’ve done, it’s clear that children who go crazy and get in trouble mostly have parents who don’t set reasonable rules and boundaries.  If their parents are loving and accepting no matter what they do — even when they are unruly — children take their parent’s lack of rules as a sign that they don’t really care about them — that they don’t really want the job of being parents in the first place.

    On the flip side, parents who are consistent in enforcing rules and boundaries are often the same parents who become the closest with their children. Of course, this doesn’t mean you should over-do the rules, or make rules just for the sake of making rules.  Parents that are too controlling raise children that are stifled and bored.  And stifled, bored kids are likely to rebel.

     

    Read more
  • Nun arrested for ‘helping five priests rape deaf children

    A Roman Catholic nun stands accused of helping five priests sexually abuse deaf children.

    Kosaka Kumiko, 42, allegedly helped the priests cover up anal and vaginal rapes, fondling and oral sex at the institution for deaf students in Argentina.

    The abuse allegedly took place in the bathrooms, dorms, garden and a basement at the school in Lujan de Cuyo, a city about 620 miles northwest of Buenos Aires. Authorities began investigating Kumiko when a former student claimed she made her wear a nappy to cover up bleeding after she was raped. At least 24 children have come forward to report abuse at the school.

    Children said priests Nicola Corradi and the Rev. Horacio Corbacho repeatedly raped them by an image of the Virgin Mary inside the small school chapel. Nobody else would have heard their cries because the other children at the school were deaf.

    Abuse by priests is alleged to have taken place where children went to confession as well as elsewhere in the grounds. ‘They always said it was a game: ‘Let’s go play, let’s go play’ and they would take us to the girls’ bathroom,’ said one of the women who claims that she was abused at the school in Argentina. Five priests were previously arrested in late November by police who raided the school and found porn magazines and about $34,000 in Corradi’s room.

    This week Kumiko, who is originally from Japan but has Argentine citizenship, was arrested and charged over the allegations she helped them.

    She also stands accused of physically abusing students in her care. Authorities in Argentina say she had been on the run for about a month before turning herself in. Local media showed the nun in handcuffs and wearing her habit and a bullet-proof vest as she was escorted by police to a court hearing. Kumiko denied any wrongdoing during the eight-hour hearing on Thursday.

    Authorities say that she lived at the Provolo Institute for children with hearing problems from 2004 until 2012.

    She was first investigated when a former student accused of making her wear a nappy to cover up a hemorrhage after she was allegedly raped by priest Horacio Corbacho. Corbacho, fellow priest Nicola Corradi and three other men were arrested last year after they were charged with sexually abusing at least two dozen students at the Provolo Institute. They are being held at a jail in Mendoza and have not spoken publicly since the arrest. If found guilty, the accused face 10 to 50 years in prison.

     

    Corradi had earlier been accused in Italy of abusing students at the Provolo Institute in Verona, a notorious school for the deaf where hundreds of children are believed to have been sexually assaulted over the years by two dozen priests and religious brothers. Advocates for clerical sex abuse have expressed anger that Corradi wasn’t sanctioned by the Vatican and allegedly went on to abuse children in Pope Francis’ native Argentina. A Vatican investigative commission recently visited Mendoza to learn more about the case against the priests.

     

     

    Read more
  • 30 questions about money you should ask your partner

    30 questions about money you should ask your partner.

    Disagreements over money are usually cited as one of the top three reasons most couples divorce (communication and sex are the other two). I couldn’t think of many things potentially more frustrating than if my partner kept putting us into debt when I desired to live modestly and have an early retirement. How each of you view money will be a very, very important part of your relationship. For some people spending money is an addiction or compulsion.

    1. Have you ever saved for a major expense or purchase or have you always put it on credit?
    2. Do you get stressed out when finances are really tight? 
    3. If I thought we needed help keeping our finances under control and suggested a “debt counselor” would you go with me?
    4. What is the minimum amount you think you could spend on a wedding and be happy with it?
    5. If you were single and quite wealthy, how would you weed out the "gold diggers"?
    6. How much debt do you think a couple should shoulder themselves with the first year or two of marriage given that financial problems early in a marriage is one of the leading causes of divorce? 
    7. Do you think you could function without a credit card? Have you ever tried?
    8. What do you put on your credit cards? 
    9. Do you think our family has the right to know your financial affairs (whether you are rich or deep in debt)? What would you tell them if they asked how much money you and your spouse make or how much money you have in the bank? 
    10. Do you have the self-control to only spend each month what you can pay off? Or do you always carry balances on your credit cards? 
    11. Do you think we should keep our money in joint or individual accounts? Why? 
    12. How do we decide how to spend our money? Do we have free reign to spend whatever we want as long as it is "my money" or is there an amount (£100, £500, £5,000) at which we need to discuss before making a purchase? 
    13. Do you think it is wise to lend significant amounts of money to boyfriends/girlfriends? Could it cloud the relationship? 
    14. Do you think you have ever been "used" for money? 
    15. Do you often feel that your partner doesn't respect your hard earned income by the way they spend it? 
    16. Which of us has the best skills at paying the bills and keeping track of our expenses? Which of us has the best skills for investing our money?
    17. Do you tend to buy luxury items or are you frugal with your money? 
    18. Look in your wallet. How many credit cards do you have? Do you need that many?
    19. Would you rather live modestly and retire modestly at 50 or would you rather live more extravagantly and retire modestly at 65? 
    20. Have you ever gotten a second job to help pay for your nonessential purchases? 
    21. Do you currently have a will? If not, why? 
    22. If you got into financial difficulties, what would you try to do to get out of it? 
    23. If you were married and inherited £200,000, how would you decide what to do with the money? Would your spouse have any input? What would you want to do if your spouse inherited the money? 
    24. Do you think your partner mismanages their money? 
    25. How much do you owe on all your credit cards? All other loans? 
    26. If you married someone who had a lot of debt and bills, how would you feel about helping your mate pay them off? 
    27. Have you ever filed for bankruptcy? 
    28. Have you ever made a loan to someone of a large sum of money? Would you do it again? 
    29. Have you ever dated someone just because they had (or you thought they had) money? 
    30. Do you think life insurance is a wise "investment"?
    31. What do you think would be fair terms in the agreement? When men and women are dating, who do you think should pay for the date? Whoever arranged the date? Whoever make. 

     

     

    Read more

Latest Articles

Most Popular